Archive for October 3rd, 2007

implicated

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2007

Gaw. Is this what happens once beginner’s enthusiasm wears off with a blog? Man, I’m slacking. Or I just haven’t felt like posting. Is that laziness, or simply privacy? Surely someone has written a Kubler-Ross-esque treatise on the 5 stages of blogging: if not, given what I’m doing/not doing, and performing some basic forensic analysis of the wasted hulls of abandoned blogs littering the internet, I suspect it would go something like:

1. beginner’s enthusiasm
2. TMI
3. distraction from blog by living of actual life
4. password log-in amnesia
5. abandonment

I’m doing what I can do balance out 1 and 3. 2 is distasteful (although I might occasionally flirt with it), 4 hasn’t happened yet ’cause I have a highly self-entertaining password that’s hard to forget, and 5, well, I’m getting more sporadic at this, but I’m not planning on abandoning this anytime soon.

Anyway.
Last night was a pretty big hoot: my good friend Jonn Herschend premiered his twisted, wonderful infomercial- gone- terribly- astray, “Everything Is Better Now“, at Oakland’s cinematic gem, the Parkway Speakeasy Theater. (Cinematic gem not in some Beaux-Arts fanciness way, cinematic gem in that “pitchers of beer and pizza with your movie” way. I don’t even like beer, but I like the idea of beer in a pitcher with my movie).

Since he didn’t want to be caught holding the bag, Jonn implicated a bunch of his friends and co-conspirators in the premiere by organizing “Guilt By Association,” a screening of a number of artsy video shorts to accompany his magnum opus.

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I’m prolly biased, since Woffords, Paint was one of the videos screened, but it was a really fun, dynamic mix of work that really seemed to resonate well with one another. I’ve been thinking lately about how often shows in galleries/museums don’t add up quite right, even when the art is great: the works are good individually, but poorly served by the curatorial premise and/or overall installation of pieces in relation to one another. With Guilt By Association, I was struck by how well the works flowed from one to the next, and how they seemed to inform one another in a variety of quirky, engaging strategies. I’d seen a number of the videos individually in the past, and I really enjoyed them much more in concert with other works. Nerdy, artsy humor was a significant thread that made things flow: even works that I hadn’t actually found that funny prior to last night, worked much better in relation to works where this was more overt. Anyway, good times.

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Go bears: UC Berkeley MFA alumni and Guilt By Association auteurs Woff, Jonn, Joe, and Will, gameface-mode, outside the Parkway after Guilt By Association.